fbpx
TEMPLATE USED:
pageid: 6674

Why Chile should be the next place you go for vacation?

 

The time has come: the time to plan your next vacation! You’re excited, it’s finally here, you can go out and discover another part of this great, big world. But where to go? There are so many options! How about Chile? Hmmm….Maybe. You’ve been hearing a lot about Chile these days, it seems like a really popular place to go at the moment. These are just some of the reasons why you should pick Chile as the next place you go for vacation!

 

 

1.Diverse landscapes – One of the hardest parts of deciding where to go on vacation is trying to decide what kind of place you want to visit. Forests? Sandy beaches? High mountains? The desert? In Chile, you don’t have to choose: Chile has practically every kind of landscape and climate imaginable! You can see high desert plateaus, salt flats, and rocky valleys in the Atacama Desert, the driest desert on Earth; visit the pristine beaches near Santiago; go hiking or rafting through the ancient forests and roaring rivers of the Lakes District; or gaze in amazement at towers of granite and glaciers in the far south in Patagonia.

 

 

2. You can do almost any sport here – No matter what kind of outdoor sport you like to do, no matter what your skill level is, and no matter what time of year it is, you can do it in Chile! You can ski down a volcano in the Lakes District or in the mountains outside Santiago; hike through Torres del Paine National Park to see amazing landscapes formed over millennia by wind, water, and glaciers;  tackle some of the world’s best white water rapids in the Lakes District; go cycling down the Carretera Austral in Aysen; go fishing, boating, or kayaking; glide off a sand dune in the north; virtually any kind of sport you want to do, there’s a place to do it. You can even go backcountry dog sledding!

 

 

3. It’s easier than ever to get around – Yes, just getting to Chile takes a long time, to say nothing of having to travel all over the country itself to get to its destinations, but thanks to its new popularity as a tourist destination, getting around Chile has become very easy and surprisingly cheap! You can do it like Chileans do and take long distances buses (which are actually very comfortable and affordable) or if you’re in more of a hurry, many low-cost airline operators are now available to airports all over the country, from the Atacama to Patagonia. And public transportation around towns is efficient and easy to figure out; big cities like Santiago have bus routes and a Metro system, and taxis and colectivos (communal taxies) are plentiful; many towns also have Lyft or Uber as well. So if you don’t want to rent a car, it’s never been easier to travel all over Chile and at very reasonable rates.

 

Source: disfrutasantiago

 

4. Safety and security – Chile are one of (if not the) safest countries in South America, with extremely low violent crime rates. People in Chile are incredibly nice and helpful to tourists, always eager to put their best foot forward to give Chile a good impression to visitors. The only exception is that it’s wise to be wary of pickpockets in big cities like Santiago, especially near popular tourist areas, but as long as you are careful with your valuables and are savvy travelers, there’s nothing to worry about!

 

Source: cocinayvino

 

5. You’ll never go thirsty – It doesn’t matter what your drink of choice is, Chile has something for you! Chile has long been famous for its world-class wines, especially reds like Cabernet Sauvignon and whites like Chardonnay, and the wine valleys near Santiago are great destinations for vineyard visits and to do tastings. But if you’re more of a beer person, not to worry! When waves of German immigrants came to Chile in the 1800s, they brought their love of beer with them and create a deeply rooted craft beer culture. You can find amazing brews all over the country, but many of the best craft breweries are located in the South, especially the Lakes District. And if you enjoy spirits, Chile is renowned for its pisco, which is a liqueur distilled from grape varietals that generally are used to make white wine. Pisco can be drunk straight, but is very popular as a base for cocktails, like the pisco sour. So drink up!

 

Source: natursan.net

 

6.Amazing gastronomy – The cuisine of other South American countries like Peru or Argentina may be better known, but food in Chile is equally interesting and delicious. Chileans love a great barbecue just as much as the next person and so the asado is a popular tradition all over the country, especially in Patagonia where a lamb is butterfly roasted over a smoldering fire on a spit. There is also a strong German influence, so around the country you can find sausage-and-potato-heavy dishes, as German desserts like kuchen. And being a country with a coastline that spans the entire country, seafood is especially popular, like paila marina (a seafood stew), sea urchin, fried fish, and chupe de jaiba (crab pie).

 

Source: reusser

 

7. Interesting mix of cultures – Chile has a fascinating history and cultural identity thanks to the mix of cultures that have come here over the years. Patagonia in southern Chile used to be home to a large group of indigenous tribes, most notably the Mapuche, a fierce warrior tribe who were the only people in South America to drive back the Spanish during colonization, and their beliefs, cuisine, and culture are still prominent throughout the country. Of course, Spanish language and cultural influence are especially strong, and you can also encounter evidence of European culture from the Welsh, English, and German immigrants who moved here for work and land throughout the 1800s. All these melding languages, traditions, and identities have created a unique national culture that varies all over the country, creating some of the most interesting food, music, architecture, art, and dance to be found anywhere in South America.

 

Guide to the Best Beach Treats in Chile

Fotografía: Turismo Chile

 

With roughly 4,270 kilometers of coastline, it is safe to say that Chile has its fair share of beaches. Each summer, locals, and tourists flock to the country’s Pacific waters to take advantage of the sun, surfing and most importantly — food.

The food along the coast is rich and unique in flavor. Without a doubt, tasting some of the country’s best beach treats is a must-do activity when visiting Chile. Here’s a look at some of the most delicious options:

 

Source: saboresdechile

 

Fresh Seafood

Ceviche: Ceviche is a well-known seafood dish in Chile. It’s a tasty combo of fish, lemon juice, onion, garlic, and cilantro. Merkén, a commonly used Chilean spice, can also be put into the dish. It’s popular and serves as a healthier snack option.

 

Source: cherrytomate

 

Machas a La Parmesana: A macha is a type of clam native to Chile. Typically a plate of these clams is served as an appetizer to share. Each clam is baked with cheese and wine, providing a rich and creamy taste.

 

Source: frostchile

 

Chupe de Mariscos: At the beach, Chileans prepare seafood in a thick, creamy stew referred to as “chupe.” The stew is prepared with various ingredients, such as breadcrumbs, cheese, onion, and seafood. You can order a mix of seafood or a specific type, such as crab (Chupe de Jaiba) or shellfish (Chupe de Locos).

 

Source: amipintacocino.blogspot

 

Fried Eats

Empanadas: Empanadas are doughy pastries filled with savory ingredients and flavors, such as meat, vegetables or cheese. They can be found throughout Chile, but are especially delicious when purchased at the beach. Beach empanadas are so tasty because they are often fried, instead of baked. Also, they can be stuffed with unique fillings, like shrimp or crab. El Hoyo in Maitencillo, La Casa De Las Empanadas in Pichilemu and Delicias Express in Valparaiso offer some of the best along the coast.

 

Source: picadas.tipicochileno

 

Chorrillana: If you plan to indulge in chorrillana, make sure you bring friends. This dish is huge and should be shared with others. It consists of fried egg, diced onion, and bits of meat over a hot plate of french fries. Chorrillana is popular throughout Chile, but its origin comes from J. Cruz, a restaurant in Valparaiso. This restaurant is a one-of-a-kind place, packed with strange, unique decorations on every wall and a line running out the door. Here you can try where the first chorrillana was created.

 

Photography: Alexander Prokopenko 

 

Sweet Snacks

Churros: Chile puts a unique twist on this classic, Latin pastry. The churro is fried and filled with creamy dulce de leche in the center and powdered sugar on top. Dulce de leche, or commonly known as manjar, is typically used in Chilean desserts. Locals love this spread and it really adds a sweet kick to the churro pastry.

 

Source: enmicocinahoy

 

Palmeras: Along the Chilean beaches, you can easily find this treat at any small food vendor. Palmeras are crispy, crunchy and sweet. They are flat, rounded pastries and often served with sugar on top.

 

Source: cherrytomate

 

Cuchufli: A cuchufli cookie has a texture similar to a chewy ice cream cone. Each one is in the shape of a tube and is made from sugar, butter, egg whites, flour, and vanilla. Inside the cookie is dulce de leche. Cuchufli is popular amongst all ages and often served at birthday parties and celebratory events. It’s easy to find cuchufli at any grocery store, but the best ones always come from the beach. Go to any beach food stand or vendor and you can always find cuchufli, warm and freshly baked.

 

 

 

10 ways to experience Chile’s Lakes District

With its volcanoes, lakes, rivers, mountains, and unique culture, the Lakes District is one of the most enchanting places in Chile, and there are endless ways you can explore and fall in love with this lovely corner of the world. Here are our ten favorite ways to experience Chile’s Lake District!

 

Photography: Turismo Chile

 

1. Go kayaking – With its pristine blue lakes and rivers, the Lakes District is one of the best places in Chile for kayaking! There are more turbulent rivers and streams for more experienced kayakers, as well as plenty of leisurely streams and lakes that are perfect for newbies or kayakers who enjoy going kayaking to look for wildlife or go birding. Pumalin Park, Llanquihue Lake, the Petrohue River, and the Huilo Huilo Biological Reserve are all popular spots, and sea kayaking along the coast is also a wonderful way to know the bays, marshes, and waterways of the Chilean coastline.

 

 

2. Hit the trails – Valleys, mountains, volcanoes…the Lakes District is Ground Zero for great hiking in Chile! You can see amazing vistas and landscapes, as well as challenge yourself and get up close with the unique flora and fauna of the south. The national parks and protected lands of the Lakes District are great places to start for single and multi-day trekking and hiking options: Huilo Huilo Biological Reserve, Vincente Peréz Rosales National Park, and Pumalin National Park all have jaw-dropping scenery, and have a wide range of hikes for all ages and levels of experience.

 

 

 

3. Feel the thrill of white water rapids – The white water rafting in southern Chile is considered to be some of the best in the world, full of rapid descents and a wide variety of classes of rapids. The Trancura or Liucura Rivers are the rivers to go to if you want to truly experience white water rapids, either rafting or kayaking. There are options year-round, many of the top rivers are close to popular adventure destinations like Pucon, and the views from the rivers are absolutely mesmerizing. You’ll never forget the thrill of riding those white waters!

 

 

Photography: Turismo Chile

 

4. Learn about the Mapuche people – The Mapuches are one of Chile’s oldest and most culturally significant indigenous groups, and they were the only tribe that was able to beat back the Spanish when they first came to the country. The south has long been the Mapuche’s stronghold so the cultural influence here is still very strong. Many own businesses and restaurants where you can see their handicrafts and eat traditional foods, but a visit to a traditional ruka offers a fascinating glimpse into this ancient and incredible people.

 

Source: thisischile

 

5. Try local craft beers – Thanks to a surge of German immigrants in the 1800s, Southern Chile is a Mecca for craft brewing. The region has been overflowing in hops and foam heads ever since, and you’ll find breweries both big and small everywhere, making everything from IPAs to golden ales to stouts. Valdivia has a great brewing scene as it’s the home of Cerveceria Kunstmann, which is one of the oldest breweries in Chile and has a fantastic beer festival every summer. Keep going south from there and you’ll never be far from a brewery or beer garden; Pucon and Puerto Varas also have great microbrew scenes.

 

Photography: Turismo Chile

 

6. Climb up a volcano! – The Lakes District is home to many striking volcanoes, some of which are still active! But you can do much more than just enjoy their beauty; there are several that you can actually climb up! The most popular is Villarrica Volcano outside Pucon, where you can take a tour walking up to the smoking crater, take in the view (and be careful!) and then, if there’s snow, sled back down! There’s also a ski resort on one of Villarica’s slopes that’s open during the winter months.

 

 

7. Sightsee traditional German houses – The prevalence of German culture and food is part of what makes the Lakes District of Chile so unique, and this also extends to the exquisite German-Chilean houses that were built using native Alerce wood but with classic Gothic Script styling and colorful walls and trim. Although you can see an example of these houses all over the region, the German heritage neighborhood in Puerto Varas has fantastically-maintained examples that you can easily walk around the city and see, like the Kuschel House, Niklitschek House, and the German House, as well as the iconic red-and-white Church of the Sacred Heart that overlooks the city.

 

 

Photography: Turismo Chile

 

8. Taste the culinary mix of the south – The cultural melting pot of German, Spanish, Mapuche, and other European influences has created a culinary scene unlike anywhere else in Chile. German kuchen, a kind of pie which can be made with different kinds of fruit, can be enjoyed for breakfast or afternoon tea. German sausage and hearty potato dishes are also very widely eaten. Dishes like papas bravas, serrano ham, and sheep and cow are evident of the more Spanish and Chilean influences, and Mapuche cuisine heavily features foraged foods like mushrooms and wild fish. At restaurants throughout the region, you’ll be able to try the different flavors and backgrounds of this diverse part of Chile.

 

Photography: Marco Sepulveda

 

9. See world-class music and theater at the Teatro del Lago in Frutillar – Set against the dramatic backdrop of Llanquihue Lake and the Osorno Volcano, this theater has quickly made a name for itself in the world of performing arts and music as one of the top performing arts centers in South America, with its symphony and classical music series, staged plays, and arts education program for local kids. The famous Frutillar Classical Music Festival takes place here, and the theater itself is a dream to look at, the outside walls made with multi-colored wooden slats.

 

Photography: Antoine Millet

 

10. Relax in thermal hot springs – Since the Lakes District is a land of fire and water, it stands to reason that those two elements would occasionally mix in the form of thermal hot springs. There are volcanic-heated hot springs throughout the region, and one of the most popular is the Termas Geometricas near Pucon. Designers created Japanese-inspired wooden red walkways and huts stretching between the heated pools at this site, which is sheltered by a natural canyon, creating an ethereal, mystical feel.

 

Why Torres del Paine is a photographer’s paradise

Photography: Turismo Chile

 

It’s known as the eighth natural wonder of the world, and there’s a reason for that. Torres del Paine National Park, located in the Magallanes region of Chilean Patagonia, is one of the most visually arresting places on Earth, covered in granite peaks, blue glaciers, pristine lakes, and endless grassy plains full of unique local flora and fauna. All these spectacular landscapes mean that it’s one of the best places to go for a photo safari. Whether you’re a seasoned professional hoping to expand your portfolio, an amateur looking for a learning experience, or just wanting to try something new, this is why Torres del Paine is heaven on Earth for photographers!

 

Photography: Turismo Chile

 

1.Diversity of terrains and natural formations – You want mountaintops that look like the Rockies on steroids? You got ‘em. You’re looking to see some glaciers? They’re right there. You want old-growth forests? Not a problem, right this way. Windswept plains? Yep, got that too. Lakes? Rivers? Valleys? Say no more, Torres del Paine has it all. For photographers, going to a site that has a wide range of landscapes to choose from is the golden ticket, as it easily allows you to experiment with texture, light balance, color, and more without long drives in between shooting locations. Although access to some spots in Torres del Paine, like the back of the Paine Massif, can require a day or two of intermediate hiking to get to, many of the most popular places in the park can be gotten to within a few hours.

 

 

2. Variable weather – Weather can either be a photographer’s best friend or worst enemy and while Torres del Paine is notorious for its winds and at times unpredictable weather, where there is bad there is also good. Those high winds that can be setting up a tripod a bit of a chore also produces spectacular lenticular clouds over the mountains, making for amazing cloud and landscape shots. Snow or rain can utterly transform the park’s already jaw-dropping landscapes, allowing for unique images that show the park in different ways. And, of course, if you visit outside of high season in the winter, spring, or fall, you can stunning seasonal photographs (fall is especially great for the foliage up against the mountains). And of course, just as quickly as the weather can turn bad, it can clear up and be a gorgeous day. A little patience and perseverance in the face of weather is what makes a photography session in Torres del Paine one of the books.

 

Photography: Justin Hofman

 

3. Stellar opportunities to see wildlife up close – Torres del Paine isn’t just a hotspot for landscape photographers; it’s also a great place to see native wildlife in its natural habitat and be able to capture the moment! Herds of guanacos roam the pampas of the park throughout the year and can be easily spotted, and sightings of condors, Darwin’s Rhea (a large bird which is similar to an ostrich or emu), and red and grey foxes are also pretty frequent. But then there are the rare sightings, which are really a treat. You might be lucky enough to catch a glimpse of a huemul, a small deer that appears on the Chilean coat of arms, or, the crown jewel of Patagonian wildlife sightings, a puma! Pumas can relax for hours out in the pampas or be in hiding waiting to attack prey, giving you ample time to snap those pics!

 

 

4.Peace and quiet that allows you to practice your craft – There’s nothing like having no one else around to put you at ease and allow you to spend hours experimenting with angles, lens, and shutter speed. Even though Torres del Paine is one of the most popular trekking destinations in South America right now, there are still plenty of places around the park and on the trails where the crowds and noise go away and it’s just you and your surroundings. So if you love going to remote, peaceful sites for your shoots, this is the place to be.

If you’re interested in trying out photography in Torres del Paine, check out our new Torres del Paine Photo Safari program, led by professional photographer and tour leader Justin Hofman. Find out more here!